There are two ways to consider what the best electric cars on the market are. One way is to consider what the absolute best cars are, regardless of price. The other way is to consider what the best cars are when taking price into account. Or, as is the case below, you can include a little bit of both.

I’m looking at 15 top electric vehicle choices and comparing these electric cars. I’m ordering them according to base price (MSRP in USA when the vehicle is on the US market) and focusing almost entirely on what I see as the core selling points for each model. I personally think that almost all of these models have enough range for a normal person’s use if they have home charging — or probably even if they just have workplace charging. However, range is one of the biggest things that varies across models, that people are willing to pay more for, and that consumers are curious about. So, the three core pieces of information I’m providing for all models are: base price, vehicle class, and base range (the EPA’s range rating unless otherwise stated).

If you have different ways to compare what you consider to be the best electric cars on the market, feel free to share those comparisons down in the comments. Naturally, in my humble opinion, no gasoline-powered or diesel-powered vehicles compare to any of these, so this is essentially a comparison of the best cars on the market in these categories. There are some excluded categories (pickup trucks stand out here in the United States), but electric options are still limited, unfortunately.

On the bottom of the article I’m including 4 models that are only available in Europe, providing their UK pricing. I do not include any China-specific models here since almost none of our readers live in China — about half live in the USA and the other half in Canada, the UK, Europe, India, Australia, South Africa, etc.


Nissan LEAF

Nissan LEAFs. Photo by Zach Shahan, CleanTechnica

Price — $31,670
Range — 149 miles
Class — Compact car

Nissan’s LEAF webpage.

The LEAF’s big selling point is its low price, and you can reportedly get one well below MSRP from some dealers. At $32,000, getting an EV with 149 miles of range just doesn’t seem logical, but if you can get massive discounts on one, the story may change. Though, even in that case, you’ve potentially got some other options with deep discounts, similar features, but much more range. In such a case, it’s hard to understand the reason for buying a LEAF over one of these other options.


Chevy Bolt EV

2022 Chevrolet Bolt EV. Photo courtesy of Chevrolet.

Price — $31,995
Range — 259 miles
Class — Subcompact car

Chevrolet’s Bolt EV webpage.

The base MSPR of a 2021 Chevy Bolt EV shows as $36,500 on the Chevrolet website, but if you click the menu and look at the drop-down options, you see the 2022 Chevy Bolt EV already featured and its lowest trim has a base MSRP that is now almost $5,000 lower! The big selling point for the Bolt EV, though, is that dealers often offer it for well below MSRP. We’ll see if that continues to be the case with 2022 models.


Chevy Bolt EUV

2022 Chevrolet Bolt EUV. Photo courtesy of Chevrolet.

2022 Chevrolet Bolt EUV. Photo courtesy of Chevrolet.

2022 Chevrolet Bolt EUV. Photo courtesy of Chevrolet.

Price — $33,995
Range — 250 miles
Class — Subcompact crossover

Chevrolet’s Bolt EUV webpage.

This is a brand new 2022 model, so we don’t really know how dealer pricing will look. In any case, $34,000 for a long-range crossover (even a compact one) is a pretty appealing offer!


Hyundai Kona EV

Hyundai Kona EV. Photo by Kyle Field, CleanTechnica

Price — $37,390
Range — 258 miles
Class — Subcompact crossover

Hyundai’s Kona EV webpage.

Priced a bit below a Tesla Model 3 but offering nearly as much range and the crossover body style many people want, the Kia Niro EV offers an affordable compact crossover package with enough range for 99% of needs and a comfort level that satisfies many families.

The downside is that you can now get larger and spunkier crossovers for a little bit more money. (See further down the list.)


Kia Niro EV

Kia Niro EV. Photo courtesy of Kia.

Price — $39,090
Range — 239 miles
Class — Compact crossover

Kia’s Niro EV webpage.

Priced a bit below a Tesla Model 3 but offering nearly as much range and the crossover body style many people want, the Kia Niro EV offers an affordable compact crossover package with enough range for 99% of needs and a comfort level that satisfies many families.

The downside is that you can now get larger and spunkier crossovers for a little bit more money. (See further down the list.)


Tesla Model 3

Tesla Model 3. Photo by Zach Shahan, CleanTechnica.

Price — $39,490
Range — 263 miles
Class — Midsize sedan

Tesla’s Model 3 webpage.

The Model 3 is the top selling electric vehicle in the world by an enormous margin. Without a doubt, the mixture of tech, range, performance, styling, space, and price make it one of the most influential cars in modern history. Naturally, as an owner myself, I’m biased, but I’m not the only one.

As with other Tesla models, the Supercharging network, Tesla infotainment, and Tesla Autopilot are unique to the Tesla experience and lifestyle.


Volkswagen ID.4

Volkswagen ID.4. Photo by Kyle Field, CleanTechnica

Price — $39,995
Range — 250 miles
Class — Compact crossover

Volkswagen’s ID.4 webpage.

The ID.4 has one clear target: give people the things they want the most (crossover design and space, decent range, decent tech) at the lowest possible price. The styling is perhaps bland to someone who prefers a Mustang Mach-E or Tesla Cybertruck, but it fits well among the top selling vehicles in the world, and especially in Europe, yet has a 2021 electric-era tinge to it. This could become one of the highest volume models in the world — if people do decide that the ID.4 hits a price-range-specs-features sweet spot.


Ford Mustang Mach-E

Ford Mustang Mach-E. Photo by Zach Shahan, CleanTechnica.

Price — $42,895
Range — 230 miles
Class — Compact/Midsize crossover

Ford’s Mustang Mach-E webpage.

The Ford Mustang Mach-E is the vehicle closest to a Tesla that I’ve ever experienced. While it lacks the full infotainment system a Tesla has, it does have a large touchscreen and could potentially get more features in the future. While it lacks Supercharger access, it is the first model in the US to have Plug&Play capability on ultrafast charging networks. It is a bit smaller than a Model Y in terms of cargo space, but it still has plenty of space for a normal family’s needs. At the end of the day, the big selling point is its style. It exterior style, interior style, and driving style are uniquely Mustang, and that is lovable to a lot of us. It’s truly one of the funnest highly practical vehicles in history, and I expect to see a lot move off of Ford dealer lots in the coming decade.

Also, there are a range of truly differentiated trims — one prioritizing range (California Route 1), one prioritizing performance (GT), one prioritizing affordability (Select), and one prioritizing premium features (Premium). So, there are options for everyone.


Tesla Model Y

Tesla Model Y. Photo by Zach Shahan, CleanTechnica.

Price — $47,190
Range — 326 miles
Class — Compact/Midsize crossover

Tesla’s Model Y webpage.

The comfort, tech, cargo space, range, and performance for the price is unbelievable in this model. Actually, some critics don’t believe it’s possible or real. But it is, and that combo quickly made the Model Y one of the best selling electric vehicles in the world. It is likely to surpass the Model 3 as the best selling model by the end of the year, and Elon Musk (among others) thinks it will become the world’s top selling vehicle of any type within a few years.

The argument for the Model Y is basically that it offers everything many buyers want, and often at a level a bit above the competition.

As with other Tesla models, the Supercharging network, Tesla infotainment, and Tesla Autopilot are unique to the Tesla experience and lifestyle.


Audi e-tron

Audi e-tron. Photo by Zach Shahan, CleanTechnica.

Price — $65,900
Range — 222 miles
Class — Compact/Midsize crossover

Audi e-tron’s webpage.

The Audi e-tron is not moving off of lots based on its range-for-price ranking. Its big selling point is the luxury, accoutrements, and style of a top-end Audi. Also, for those who like this, it blends into the conventional auto fleet much more. I can spot them on the road, but it’s hard unless I can get a glance at the “e-tron” tag on the back or side.


Tesla Model S

Price — $79,990
Range — 412 miles
Class — Full-size sedan

Tesla’s Model S webpage.

The original electric supercar, and still the top-of-the-line car of any type in terms of performance, tech, and I would say swagger. If you want to be able to beat any Lamborghini, Ferrari, or Porsche on the drag strip, this is the car for you. If you don’t want to spend the money (or don’t have it) for the Plaid edition, the base Model S still has staggering performance and prestige.

As with other Tesla models, the Supercharging network, Tesla infotainment, and Tesla Autopilot are unique to the Tesla experience and lifestyle.


Tesla Model X

Tesla Model X trio with two Model S in between. Photo courtesy of David Havasi.

Price — $89,990
Range — 250 miles
Class — Compact crossover

Tesla’s Model X webpage.

The X, of course, the the bigger version of the Model S, with a bit lower acceleration but also the incomparable falcon-wing doors that some love and some hate. (For the record, I love them.) The X is the quickest SUV in the world, so it’s not like it doesn’t hold its own on any drag strip around the globe. However, its big appeal is as a luxurious, techy people mover. Just don’t look at the price tag unless you’re in the 1%.

As with other Tesla models, the Supercharging network, Tesla infotainment, and Tesla Autopilot are unique to the Tesla experience and lifestyle.



Peugeot e-208
(Europe only)

Price — £27,225 (after £2,500 Plug In Car Grant)
Range — 217 miles / 349 km (WLTP)
Class — Supermini (B Class)

Peugeot’s UK e-208 webpage.

The e-208 has undercut the price of the next two models on this list! (Barely.) Hence its ability to score high sales in certain markets and even challenge the years-long reigning queen, the ZOE, in its home market. With comparable range and sizing to the next two models, much (or most?) of the purchase decision in this class comes down to styling. While they all look extremely similar on paper, they have highly differentiated faces, profiles, and backends. The e-208 clearly has its appeal and knows how to use it.

Think I’m putting too much weight on design as a differentiator? Go to the e-208 website and you’ll get much more of that.

Despite its relatively low price, the e-208 offers driver-assist features like “active lane keeping assistance.”


Renault ZOE
(Europe only)

Price — £27,495 (after £2,500 Plug In Car Grant)
Range — 234 miles / 377 km (WLTP)
Class — Supermini (B Class)

Renault’s UK ZOE webpage.

The Renault ZOE was the top selling electric car in Europe for years and is still one of its top models. Clearly, it offers one of the most compelling mixes of affordability, range, charging capability, and features. At the very least, for a car that has been a top seller, if you are looking for a vehicle in this price range and class, the ZOE deserves a test drive or two.


Fiat 500e
(Europe only)

Price — £27,495 (after £2,500 Plug In Car Grant)
Range — 199 miles / 320 km (WLTP)
Class — Supermini (B Class)

Fiat’s UK 500e webpage.

There’s no doubt that the 500e has one particularly big selling point. It’s cute — or cool, depending on what lingo you want to use. The Fiat 500 is simply an iconic car stylistically, and the 500e brings that into a new era.

Aside from the style factor, it is also certainly a fun car to drive, and it comes at a relatively low price. Add in super low operational costs and the cost of ownership looks even better and may have it competing

While it’s not going to win any range awards, 199 miles is plenty for most common use. My Tesla Model 3 Standard Range Plus (SR+) seems to be down to 205 miles of range and it feels like 2–3 times more than I need to have a comfortable, convenient charging lifestyle (with home charging). In Europe, where people drive about half as much, I personally think it’s rare to genuinely need more than that.

Only one thing — if you do get the 500e, you have to get that blue above. It is too cool.

Oh, also, the New 500 is reportedly the “first small car” to come with Level 2 autonomous driving (driver-assist) features, like lane keeping. (Though, note that the e-208 appears to offer similar — or even the same — capabilities.)


Volkswagen ID.3 (Europe only)

Price — £30,870 (after £2,500 Plug In Car Grant)
Range — 217 miles / 349 km (WLTP)
Class — Compact (C Class)

Volkswagen’s UK ID.3 webpage.

With the ID.3, you pay slightly more than the other Europe-only models above and get a somewhat bigger car in return. For many, the ID.3 hits the sweet spot between space, price, and range. The styling is also a pull for many buyers.


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